Organ donor Law Change from 2020

From spring 2020, all adults in England will be considered potential organ donors, unless they choose to opt out or are in one of the excluded groups. This is commonly referred to as an ‘opt out’ system. You may also hear it referred to as ‘Max and Keira’s Law’.

What does that mean?
If there is no recorded decision for you on the NHS Organ Donor Register, it will be assumed that you want to be an organ donor when you die.

Adults covered by the change will still have a choice about whether they want to be an organ donor and their families will still be approached to discuss the option of organ donation.

Why is the law changing?
Every day, three people die in need of an organ, because not enough organs are available for transplant.

The law is being changed to help save and improve more lives.

What do I have to do?
If you want to be an organ donor, the best way to record your choice is to join the NHS Organ Donor Register.
If you do not want to be an organ donor, you should register a ‘refuse to donate’ decision on the NHS Organ Donor Register. This is also known as opting out.
If you are already registered on the NHS Organ Donor Register, and your decision remains the same, you should tell your family what you want.
If you want to change your decision, which is already registered on the NHS Organ Donor Register, you should amend your registration.

Whatever you decide, make sure you tell your family, so they can honour your choice.

Body Donations: no change
For body donors, the law has not changed. To donate your body to medical teaching and to allow training for surgeons to learn new procedures without harming patients in the process, you still have to record your wish and decision in your testamente and last will.

https://www.organdonation.nhs.uk/about-donation/how-the-law-is-changing/english-organ-donation-law/

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